Charles Bland

Service:                Army

Rank:                    Private

Service No:           5989

Unit:                     15th (The Kings) Hussars

 

Charles (aka George) Bland was born ca 1894 in Bristol.  At the time of the 1901 census Charles his parents John & Florence & 3 siblings are living at 3, St James Terrace Bristol, John Bland was an Army Pensioner originally from Stourbridge Worcester & his mother Florence was from Dorset.

On the 1911 census we find Charles at Wellington Lines Aldershot so he must have signed on to become a career soldier.

15th (The King's) Hussars August 1914 : at Longmoor. 18 August 1914 : landed at Rouen and soon split up to provide Squadrons for Divisions: A Sqn to 3rd Division; B Sqn to 2nd Division; C Sqn to 1st Division.14 April 1915 : Squadrons returned and regiment reformed.

Charles entered the war zone on 16th August 1914, one of the old contemptables.

Charles is buried & remembered with honour in the Berlin South-Western Cemetery. Grave VIII. J. 4.

The following cemeteries are among those from which graves were brought to Berlin South-Western Cemetery:-
ALTDAMM PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 8 kilometres East of Stettin, in the Province of Pommern (Pomerania), contained the graves of 46 soldiers from the United Kingdom, three from Newfoundland and two from Canada, who died in 1915-1918.
BUDEROSE PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, near Guben, in the Province of Brandenburg, contained the graves of 18 soldiers from the United Kingdom, one from Canada and one from Australia, all of whom died in 1918.
CROSSEN PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, 3 kilometres East of Crossen, on the river Oder, in the Province of Brandenburg, contained the graves of 66 sailors and soldiers from the United Kingdom, one from Australia and one from South Africa all of whom died in 1918.
DOBERITZ PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, about 19 kilometres West of Berlin, in the Province of Brandenburg, contained the graves of 38 sailors and soldiers from the United Kingdom who died in 1914-1918.
HASENHEIDE GARRISON CEMETERY, on the South side of the city of Berlin, contained the graves of 369 Russian, 125 French, and 58 Belgian, American, Italian, Rumanian, Portuguese or Serbian soldiers; 63 sailors, soldiers and Marines from the United Kingdom; and one Indian soldier.
HEILSBERG PRISONERS OF WAR CEMETERY, in Ostpreussen (East Prussia), contained the graves of 50 soldiers and one Marine from the United Kingdom, who died in 1917 and 1918. Only twelve of which were found when the graves were being recovered; the remainder are still buried at Heilsberg.
KLEIN WITTENBERG OLD CEMETERY, 3 kilometres West of Wittenberg, in the Prussian province of Saxony, contained the graves of 23 soldiers, one Marine and eight civilians from the United Kingdom and one soldier from India, all of whom died in 1915; the NEW (or PRISONERS OF WAR) CEMETERY, those of 71 soldiers and three civilians from the United Kingdom, two soldiers from Canada and one from Australia, who died in 1915, 1917 and 1918; and WITTENBERG OLD SMALL CEMETERY those of two soldiers from the United Kingdom who died in 1914 and 1915. The first and third of these cemeteries are associated with the outbreak of typhus at the Wittenberg camp in December 1914.
It is fair to assume Charles died as a prisoner of war, his parents John & Florence were living at 143 Bell Hill St. George at that time.  

 Image courtesy CWGC

Charles would have been entittled to the 1914 Star with clasp,British War Medal and Victory Medal, it is not known if these were claimed by his next of kin.

References

Commonwealth War Graves Commission

1901 & 1911 UK household census

Wikipedia.